TKC BREAKING NEWS!!! LEGAL THREATS & NORTHEAST PUSH BACK CONFRONT KANSAS CITY TINY HOMELESS VILLAGE!!!

Kansas City wants to dump a "tiny homeless village" on Northeast and the neighborhood is now quickly organizing resistance.

We've got a few errands, phone calls and a coffee run to undertake but here are the basics for now . . .

- City Hall plans to build a homeless village near a site that environmental officials have ruled toxic. They might or might not realize that the adjacent area has also been impacted by an EPA ruling.

- A recent Zoom meeting was rampant with neighborhood complaints and questions. The managers of this effort from the Mayor's office didn't have much luck convincing constituents. They view the homeless warming project at Bartle Hall as a success and see the upcoming village as an extension of their work. 

- Northeast leaders have recruited one of the biggest names in the local legal community to represent them in their fight. Yes, he's from THAT political family that holds sway from this cowtown to the nation's capital.

An insider puts it best and his quote seems to sum up the fight so far . . . 

"The mayor is advocating for the homeless and nobody has a problem with that . . . KC is a very compassionate place. But WHO IS GOING TO STAND UP FOR HOME OWNERS AND TAXPAYERS?!?! The people who live, work and invest in Northeast deserve representation as well and right now our community has said NO to this project in its current configuration. 

"Northeast has changed over the years, there are people who live here now who are highly skilled and have the resources to stand up to City Hall. I hope the mayor and the supporters of the tiny homeless village realize that . . . "

Developing . . .

Comments

  1. Here's what you forgot to include: The mayor was already beaten by a lot of these same people on the MLK street sign issue.

    For being such a smart guy, he doesn't learn very fast.

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  2. Nice teaser of a story. But you forgot the most important part - where are they planning to put Munchkin Land?

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  3. Put them in the Mayors neighborhood. They’re his personal friends, after all.

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  4. This is going to be fun! Way to go Mayor McDumbshit!

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  5. "Northeast leaders have recruited one of the biggest names in the local legal community"

    OH NO NOT CLAY CHASTAIN AGAIN

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  6. Put it out in country and make it a self supporting farm. They can work.

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  7. Fuck you! Keep the trash in the city where it belongs! Let them tear up your shit.

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  8. Wall E. Weasel5/7/21, 5:08 PM

    "City Hall plans to build a homeless village near a site that environmental officials have ruled toxic. They might or might not realize that the adjacent area has also been impacted by an EPA ruling."

    The only place I can think of that even remotely meets this description is up by the current city tow lot. You've got the old Conservation Chemical Company superfund site, the Hawthorn generating station, and the experimental pilot wastewater disposal project right there. Maybe that unused plat of land between the tow lot and Hawthorn?

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  9. ^^If it's not toxic now it will be!

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  10. There’s plenty of room downtown, lickass can keep a better eye on his childish ideas that way.

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  11. At present, the CCC site contains miscellaneous surface structures (abandoned tanks and buildings) and six basins (presently covered) that were used for the storage, treatment, and disposal of a variety of chemicals, liquid wastes, and sludges. The dimensions and exact locations of the lagoons migrated over the site during the twenty year (1960-1980) *396 period that the site was in operation. Waste incineration was also practiced intermittently during the operational period of the site.



    The exact nature and quantities of chemicals and wastes handled during the site's active operating period are unknown. However, reconstruction of available site operating records (many records were destroyed in a 1970 fire) indicates that the primary materials accepted at the CCC site included organics, solvents, acids, caustics, metal hydroxides, and cyanide compounds. Reports also indicate that pesticides, herbicides, waste oils, organic solvents, halogenated compounds, arsenic and elemental phosphorus were handled at the site. In addition, there are reports and some evidence that pressurized cylinders and other metal containers were placed in the lagoons. It is estimated that at least 28 million gallons of various type wastes were accepted between 1970 and 1980. The facility handled liquids, sludges, and solids.

    The CCC site, located at 8900 Front Street in Kansas City, Missouri, is within the 100-year floodplain and has been flooded in the past where the Missouri River rises and covers the site. Adjacent to the CCC site are the Mobay Chemical Company and the Kansas City Power and Light Company's Hawthorne Generating Plant. The Mobay Chemical Company uses groundwater for its wastewater treatment. The KCP & L Hawthorne Plant uses groundwater for fire protection. There is an agricultural field located directly adjacent to the property in which soybeans have been grown in the past. There are residences *398 located along the river, as well as businesses that are located near Interstate 435 in the area. Some of the residences north of the river use water supplied by domestic wells that are in the ground in that area. There are well fields downstream from the CCC site that utilize the water from the Missouri River aquifer. The City of Independence uses a wellfield down-gradient from the site as does the City of Liberty. The City of Lexington, Missouri, utilizes the Missouri River directly for withdrawal of water. The area around the CCC site has been planned for future industrial development which would utilize the groundwater in this aquifer.

    Hazardous substances have been and are being released from the site and migrating toward the east and toward the Missouri River. It was estimated that the annual rate of discharge of hazardous materials from the site into the groundwater is in excess of 22,000 pounds, and that the likelihood of a significant rate of discharge continuing in the future is high. It was also opined that the likelihood of some or all of the hazardous substances being directly encountered by aquatic organisms or other living creatures in the course of their migration was fairly high in that a number of the substances are located at the surface and that a number of different mammals and birds and amphibious life frequent the area.

    In summary, the government's witnesses determined that a 3' slurry wall at perimeter and interior withdrawal wells/treatment system were necessary in order to prevent further contamination of the aquifer and migration of hazardous substances to the Missouri River. The slurry wall shall be keyed into bedrock and into the multi-layered cap. The soil-bentonite backfill shall be designed to achieve a hydraulic conductivity of not more than 10-7 cm/sec.

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  12. more likely to be a contaminated site east bottoms proximity closer to independence ave.

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  13. Are these like the $800 one room garden sheds sold at Home Depot?

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  14. I stand corrected. It's perfect for a homeless camp!

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  15. What a dumb idea. Why burden the city with this. There should be a charity group that can do this. Most don't because they're already struggling to keep up with demand.

    Bad idea all the way around.

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  16. I hear a lot of complaining but no solutions. Typical TKC response.

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  17. 6:34 you keep acting like you have had a solution

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  18. Put them up in the now empty Sam's Town Casino building down by the river. It's not in a residential area so no property value impact and a lot of them hang out down that way anyway. Seriously.

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  19. The solution has been floated here plenty often 6:34 you just don't like it. Tough shit. Keep doing it your way and you will have worse problems a year from now.

    A - Cut the mask bullcrap
    B - Drop ALL restrictions
    C - Open EVERYTHING up
    D - Get your ass a job and work for a living like everyone else

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  20. Or he could run around wearing 4 masks and crapping his diaper like his hero Biden LOL!

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  21. 3 hots and cots without jail cells? Sounds better then rent.

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  22. Why compare a homeless person against a CPA that works out of their house? We are not one class of people in the US. The homeless did not get the breaks as a result of the section of class they were born in. Zip Codes Matter. Mortality matters. KC Homeless Union say we should organize by industry so no one is in competition with small business from a different class of society.

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  23. Put them in Loose Park.

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  24. Space is not the problem. There's plenty of undeveloped park property and there's 10k empty houses. These houses need to be saved even if it's making sure they are kept boarded up over the next two decades. Kansas City needs to see what's over the hill.

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  25. The site is where those apartments they just razed off independence were. It's an old landfill

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