Saturday, January 25, 2020

TKC SATURDAY NIGHT PLAYLIST!!! CULTURAL APPROPRIATION AND THE KANSAS CITY CHIEFS EXAMINED!!!



Let's start this culture war consideration of the Kansas City Chiefs by defining terms:

Cultural appropriation, at times also phrased cultural misappropriation, is "the adoption of elements of one culture by members of another culture. This can be controversial when members of a dominant culture appropriate from disadvantaged minority cultures."

"According to critics of the practice, cultural appropriation differs from acculturation, assimilation, or equal cultural exchange in that this appropriation is a form of colonialism: cultural elements are copied from a minority culture by members of a dominant culture, and these elements are used outside of their original cultural context—sometimes even against the expressly stated wishes of members of the originating culture."

Translation:

MIDDLE-CLASS WHITE DRESSED IN NATIVE AMERICAN GARB AND SUPPORTING "THE CHIEFS" PRESENTS A PROBLEMATIC VISION FOR PROGRESSIVES!!!

There's already a renewed effort to explain away the apprehension . . .

Biz Insider: The Chiefs got their controversial name from a Kansas City mayor who went by 'Chief' and insisted on the team being named after himself

That explanation might hold up IF former Mayor Bartle's nickname didn't also come with it's own problems and involve his own misappropriation of Native American culture.



Still, one of our favorite blog readers offers his take on the topic . . .

Super Dave seyz: "I have since come to realize this understanding of cultural appropriation is flawed. It assumes cultures are 100 percent original. But as history has shown, cultures evolve over time and influence one another. Stated another way, there is no such thing as cultural appropriation because there is no such thing as an original culture."

And so we ask . . .

WILL ALLEGED "CULTURAL APPROPRIATION" CURSE AND RUIN THE SUPER BOWL FOR KANSAS CITY FANS?!?!?

This isn't just a question for progressives as history always looks unfavorably on those who FAILED to speak up against injustice, stereotypes and insensitivity.

Loud and clear, time and time again, Native American communities tell sports fans that they are more than mascots.

Locals may disagree on the offense that should be taken by the "Chiefs" but few can deny the continued controversy over the moniker and various visual representations over the years.

And all of this inspires our playlist tonight . . .



As always, thanks for reading this week and have a safe and fun Saturday night.

68 comments:

Anonymous said...

over time it won't hold up. 50 years from now it will look barbaric and sad. Like most u.s. traditions. Sad.

Wink Martindale said...

Sure. By this logic, non-Whites should stop using electricity, indoor plumbing, internal combustion engines, and pretty much every modern convenience invented by the bad ole' White Man, which includes pretty much everything.

Silvestor orgalthorp said...

Well there is a simple solution to this
Just stop feeling guilty about everything and enjoy the world around you

Anonymous said...

Where do these idiots come from?

Anonymous said...

I don't know, Stupor Dave, idiot geezer culture seems to have started with you.and taken on a life of it's own on this website.

Anonymous said...


then there's Liz Warren...

And how said...

49ers winbuilt racist beaches!

Anonymous said...

8:45 awwww chimpy, another bad day at the zoo, too cold for visitors to laugh at your monkey shines! Hahahahaha!

Byron Funkhouser said...

Apparently, some white men don't have a problem with this. How surprising. The point is does it matter to you that some Native Americans have a problem with it? Apparently, not.

Where's Chuck to exclaim, "America hates you white boy"?

Do intelligent, educated people still believe in "curses"? Amazing.


I hope the Kansas City Chiefs win the Super Bowl, but I would be happier hoping for the Kansas City Pioneers to win, instead.

Just a suggestion ...

Anonymous said...


Deep state, uber-liberal Democrat DC has the "Redskins"

chuck said...

Hey Byron, glad to see you made it to the keyboard and are not hiding under your bed. That Chinese cornhole virus probably has ya shook up a little.
:-)

Look, I tell ya what, I will stop wearing corn rows, Indian Feathers, Sombreros and take my gold grill out, if every one who is not white, gives up the following.---

Do you like internal combustion engines?

Thank a few white men. (Jean Lenoir, Nikolaus Otto, Karl Benz, Rudolf Diesel, Gottlieb Daimler, Emil Jellinek, Henry Ford among others.)

Are you a fan of flush toilets and indoor plumbing?

Thank white males Alexander Cumming, Thomas Twyford, and Isaiah Rogers

Toilet paper?

Thank Joseph Gayetty, W.M.

How about washing machines and dryers?

Thank white males Alva Fisher and J. Ross Moore.

“When you’ve got your health, you’ve got just about everything” ran the tag-line in a famous Geritol commercial from the 1970s, and the guys we most have reason to be grateful for are undoubtedly those who’ve developed the medical practices and the drugs and devices that have transformed our lives over the past hundred fifty years.

Before the turkey gets carved, it’s worth taking a moment to remember a few of these brilliant, persistent, and lucky men, and recall their accomplishments. Even when they’ve won Nobel Prizes in Medicine, their names are virtually unknown. They’re not mentioned in the Core Curriculum or celebrated by Google on their birthdays.

Pain

If you ever had surgery, did you opt for anesthesia?

If so, thank a few more white males, beginning with William Clarke in New York and Crawford Long in Georgia who both used chloroform in minor surgeries in 1842. A paper published four years later by William Morton, after his own work in Boston, spread the word. Ether replaced chloroform during the next decade. There are now scores of general and regional anesthetics and sedatives and muscle relaxants, administered in tandem. The first local anesthetic has also been superseded. It was cocaine, pioneered by a Viennese ophthalmologist, Carl Koller, in 1884.

Ever take an analgesic?

Next time you pop an aspirin, remember Felix Hoffmann of Bayer. In 1897, he converted salicylic acid to acetylsalicylic acid, much easier on the stomach. Aspirin remains the most popular and arguably the most effective drug on the market. In 1948 two New York biochemists, Bernard Brodie and Julius Axelrod, documented the effect that acetaminophen (Tylenol), synthesized by Harmon Morse in 1878, had on pain and fever. Gastroenterologist James Roth persuaded McNeil Labs to market the analgesic in 1953.

I'm not done yet--

chuck said...

Infectious Diseases

Most Americans today die of heart disease or cancer, but before the twentieth century, it was infectious diseases that struck people down, and children were the primary victims. In pre-industrial England, still with the most developed economy in the world in the late 17th century, 50% of all children didn’t survive the age of 15. With the phenomenal growth of cities during the 19th century, cholera, typhoid fever, and tuberculosis became the leading killers.

In 1854, a London medical inspector, John Snow, proved that a cholera epidemic in Soho was caused by infected sewage seeping into the water supply. Until then it was thought the disease spread through the air. The sanitary disposal of sewage and the provision of clean water, possible thanks to mostly anonymous metallurgists and engineers -- an exception is the famous Thomas Crapper, who pioneered the u-shaped trap and improved, though he didn’t invent, the flush toilet -- has saved more lives than any drug or surgical innovation.

Dramatic improvements in food supply have also had an incalculable effect on health. Agricultural innovations, beginning with those introduced in England in the 18th century, were disseminated globally by the end of the 20th century -- the “Green Revolution.” Famines struck Europe as recently as the late 1860s. (The man-made famines of the 20th century are another story.) A transportation revolution made possible the provision of more than sufficient protein, calories, and nutrients worldwide. Needless to say, it was white males who designed and built the roads, canals, railroads, and ports and airports, and the ships, trains, planes, and trucks that used them, and the mines, and then wells, pipelines, and tankers that supplied the fuel they ran on.

Not done yet,we white boys are pretty busy--

chuck said...

Dr. Snow had no idea what was actually causing cholera. It was Louis Pasteur who gave the world the germ theory of disease, as every schoolchild once knew. Studying the fermentation of wine, he concluded that this was caused by the metabolic activity of microorganisms, as was the souring of milk. The critters were responsible for disease, too, he recognized, and identified three killer bacteria: staphylococcus, streptococcus, and pneumococcus. Nasty microorganisms could be killed or rendered harmless by heat and oxygenation, Pasteur discovered, and would then prevent the disease in those who were inoculated. He went on to develop vaccines for chicken cholera, anthrax, and rabies. Edward Jenner had demonstrated in in the late 1790s that the dreaded smallpox could be prevented by injecting patients with material from the pustules of cowpox victims, a much milder disease. (The word vaccine comes from vaca, one of the Latin words for cow.) Pasteur, however, was the first to immunize patients by modifying bacteria rather than through cross-vaccination.

A parade of vaccines followed. People in their mid-60s and older can remember two of the most famous: the Salk and Sabin vaccines against poliomyelitis, a paralyzing disease that had panicked American parents in the late ‘40s and early ‘50s. Children preferred Albert Sabin’s 1962 version: the attenuated virus was administered on a sugar cube. Jonas Salk’s inactivated vaccine, available in 1955, was injected.

In 1847, more than a decade before Pasteur disclosed his germ theory, the Viennese obstetrician Ignaz Semmelweis documented the effectiveness of hand washing with chlorinated water before entering a maternity ward. He brought mortality rates from puerperal fever down from 8% to 1.3%. Two decades later, having read a paper by Pasteur, Joseph Lister demonstrated the effectiveness of carbolic acid to sterilize wounds and surgical instruments. Mortality rates fell from around 50% to about 15%. The efforts of both men, especially Semmelweis, were met with ridicule and disdain.

Pasteur’s German rivals Robert Koch and Paul Ehrlich made monumental contributions to biochemistry, bacteriology, and hematology, but left the world no “magic bullet” (Ehrlich’s term). Koch identified the organism causing tuberculosis, the leading killer of the 19th century, but his attempts at finding a vaccine failed. His purified protein derivative from the bacteria, tuberculin, could be used to diagnose the disease, however. It was two French researchers, Albert Calmette and Camille Guerin, who developed a successful vaccine, first administered in 1921, though it was not widely used until after World War II.

chuck said...

Diagnostic technologies

Microscope: While the Delft draper Antonie van Leeuwenhoek didn’t invent the compound microscope, he improved it, beginning in the 1660s, increasing the curvature of the lenses, and so became the first person to see and describe blood corpuscles, bacteria, protozoa, and sperm.

Electron microscope: Physicist Ernst Ruska and electrical engineer Max Kroll constructed the prototype in Berlin in 1933, using a lens by Hans Busch. Eventually, electron microscopes would be designed with two-million power magnification. Leeuwenhoek’s had about two hundred.

Stethoscope: Thank the French physician René Laennec, who introduced what he called a microphone in 1816. British nephrologist Golding Bird substituted a flexible tube for Laennec’s wooden cylinder in 1840, and the Irish physician Arthur Leared added a second earpiece in 1851. Notable improvements were made by Americans Howard Sprague, a cardiologist, and electrical engineer Maurice Rappaport in the 1960s (a double-sided head), and Harvard cardiologist David Littmann in the same decade (enhancing the acoustics). The device undoubtedly transformed medicine, and with good reason became the symbol of the health care professional.

Sphygmograph: The first machine to measure blood pressure was created by a German physiologist, Karl von Vierordt in 1854.

X-rays: Discovered by Karl Wilhelm Röntgen, at Wurzberg in 1895, this was probably the single most important diagnostic breakthrough in medical history. Before Röntgen noticed that cathode rays, electrons emitted from a cathode tube, traveled through objects and created images on a fluorescent screen, physicians could only listen, palpitate, examine stools, and drink urine.

PET scans: James Robertson designed the first machine in 1961, based on the work of number of American men at Penn, Wash U., and Mass General, designed the first machine. The scanner provides an image from the positron emissions coming from a radioactive isotope injected into the patient, and is particularly useful for mapping activity in the brain.

CAT scans: The first model was developed by electrical engineer Godfrey Hounsfield, in London, 1972, drawing on the work of South African physicist Alan Cormack in the mid-1960s. It generates three-dimensional and cross-sectional images using computers and gamma rays.

MRI: Raymond Damadian, a SUNY professor of medicine with a degree in math, performed the first full-body scan 1977. His design was anticipated by theoretical work by Felix Bloch and Edward Purcell in the 1930s, and, later, Paul Lauterbur. MRIs map the radio waves given off by hydrogen atoms exposed to energy from magnets, and are particularly useful in imaging tissue -- and without exposing the patient to ionizing radiation.

chuck said...

Endoscopes: Georg Wolf produced the first flexible gastroscope in Berlin in 1911, and this was improved by Karl Storz in the late ‘40s. The first fiber optic endoscope was introduced in 1957 by Basil Hirschowitz, a South African gastroenterologist, drawing on the work of British physicist Harold Hopkins. The scope is indispensible in diagnosing GI abnormalities.

Angiogram: Werner Forssmann performed the first cardiac catherisation -- on himself -- in Eberswald in 1929. He inserted a catheter into his lower left arm, walked downstairs to a fluoroscope, threaded the catheter to his right atrium and injected a radioptic dye. The technique was further developed by Dickson Richards and André Courmand at Columbia in the ‘40s, and then extended to coronary arteries, initially accidentally, by Frank Sones at the Cleveland Clinic in 1958.

X-rays and scopes were quickly used in treatment as well diagnosis. Roentgen himself used his machines to burn off warts. Similarly, in 1964, Charles Dotter and Marvin Judkins used a catheter to open a blocked artery, improving the technique in 1967. Andreas Gruentzig then introduced balloon angioplasty in 1975, an inflated balloon opening the narrowed or blocked artery. In 1986, Jacques Puel implanted the first coronary stent at U. of Toulouse, and soon afterwards a Swiss cardiologist, Ulrich Sigwart, developed the first drug-eluding stent.

Anonymous said...

Nobody cares what you think bLIEron. The trouble with you is you think you speak for everybody else, well, You don’t, the Indians, blacks and everybody else don’t want you speaking on their behalf, they have their own voice, you’re embarrassing them and yourself.

chuck said...

The men who developed five of the most dramatically effective and widely used drugs in internal medicine deserve mention.

In the late ‘30s, two Mayo Clinic biochemists hoping to cure rheumatoid arthritis, Philip Hench and Edward Kendall, isolated four steroids extracted from the cortex of the adrenal gland atop the kidneys. The fourth, “E,” was very difficult to synthesize, but Merck chemist Lewis Sarrett succeeded, and in 1948, the hormone was injected into fourteen patients crippled by arthritis. Cortisone relieved the symptoms. Mass produced, with much difficulty, by Upjohn chemists in 1952, it was refined by their rivals at Schering three years later into a compound five times as strong, prednisone. In addition to arthritis, corticosteroids are used in the treatment of other inflammatory diseases, like colitis and Crohn’s, and in dermatitis, asthma, hepatitis, and lupus.

Anyone over fifty can remember peptic ulcers, extremely painful lesions on the stomach wall or duodenum. They were thought to be brought on by stress. “You’re giving me an ulcer!” was a common expression. Women were especially affected, and a bland diet was the only treatment, other than surgery. The lesions were caused by gastric acid, and two British pharmacologists and a biochemist, George Paget, James Black, and William Duncan, investigated compounds that would block the stomach’s histamine receptors, reducing the secretion of acid. There were endless difficulties. Over 200 compounds were synthesized, and the most promising, metiamide, proved toxic. Tweaking the molecule, replacing a sulfur atom with two nitrogen atoms, yielded cimetidine in 1976. As Tagamet, it revolutionized gastroenterology. It was also the first drug to generate over $1 billion in annual sales. Its successors, the proton pump inhibitors Prilosec and its near-twin Nexium, more than doubling the acid reduction, have also been blockbuster drugs.

chuck said...

Cimetidine was the culmination of one line of research that began in 1910, when a London physiologist, Henry Dale, isolated a uterine stimulant he called “histamine.” Unfortunately, when it was given to patients, it caused something like anaphylactic shock. The search began for an “antagonist” that would block its production, even before it was recognized as the culprit in hay fever (allergic rhinitis). The most successful antagonist was one was developed in 1943 by a young chemist in Cincinnati, Geroge Rieveschl, diphenhydramine, marketed as Benadryl. Ten to thirty percent of the world’s population suffers from seasonal allergies, so this was hailed as miracle drug. In the early ‘80s a second generation of antihistamines appeared that didn’t cross the brain-blood barrier and thus didn’t sedate the user. Loratadine (Claritin), the first, was generating over $2 billion in annual sales before it went generic.

Diabetes, resulting in high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia), has been known for two millennia. It was a deadly disease, type 1 rapidly fatal, type 2, adult onset, debilitating and eventually lethal. By the end of the 19th century, the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas had been identified as the source of a substance that prevented it, insulin, but this turned out to be a fragile peptide hormone, broken down by an enzyme in the pancreas during attempts to extract it. In 1921, Canadian surgeon Frederick Banting and medical student Charles Best determined a way to disable the production of the enzyme, trypsin. Injected in a teenager with type 1 diabetes, insulin was immediately effective. There is still no cure for diabetes, but today the 380 million sufferers globally can live normal lives thanks to Banting and Best.

chuck said...

In 1953, after 18 years of work, John Gibbon, a cardiologist at the University of Pennsylvania, produced a machine that oxygenated blood and pumped it around the body, permitting operations on the heart, like those performed a decade later by Michael DeBakey in Houston and René Favaloro in Cleveland. The two surgeons pioneered coronary bypass grafts, using a blood vessel in the leg or chest to re-route blood around a blocked artery. About 200,000 operations are performed each year, down from about 400,000 at the turn of the century, thanks to stents. Gibbon’s machine enabled the most widely covered operation in history, the heart transplant, first performed by South African surgeon Christian Barnard in 1967, based on research by Norman Shumway and others. Over 2,000 Americans receive heart transplants each year.

The cardiac device Americans are most likely to encounter is the defibrillator, now in airports, stadiums, supermarkets, and other public places. Thank two Swiss professors, Louis Prévost and Frédéric Batelli, who, in 1899, induced ventricle fibrillation, abnormal heartbeat, in dogs with a small electrical shock, and restored normal rhythm with a larger one. It was not until the 1940s that a defibrillator was used in heart surgery, by Claude Beck in Cleveland. A Russian researcher during World War II, Naum Gurvich, discovered that biphasic waves, a large positive jolt followed by a small negative pulse, was more effective, and a machine was constructed on this basis by an American cardiologist, Bernard Lown. Improvements by electrical engineers William Kouwenhoven and Guy Knickerbocker, and cardiologist James Jude at Hopkins in 1957, and subsequently by Karl and Mark Kroll, and Byron Gilman in the ‘90s made the device much smaller and portable.

Over three million people worldwide don’t have to worry about defibrillators or face open-heart surgery. These are the recipients of pacemakers, and can thank a Canadian electrical engineer, John Hopps. Predecessors were deterred by negative publicity about their experiments, which were believed to be machines to revive the dead. Gurvich had faced this as well. Hopps’ 1950 device used a vacuum tube. With the invention of the transistor, a wearable pacemaker became possible, and Earl Bakken designed one in 1958. Not long afterward, two Swedish engineers, Rune Elmquist and Åke Senning created an implantable pacemaker. The first recipient eventually received 26 and lived to age 86. Lithium batteries, introduced in 1976, enabled the creation of devices with a much longer life.

chuck said...

Cardiac Drugs

Cardiac stimulants have been around since the late 18th century. Thank William Withering, who published his experiments with the folk-remedy digitalis (from foxglove) in 1785.

Anti-anginal drugs were introduced a century later, also in Britain: amyl nitrite in the mid-1860s and nitroglycerin a decade later. Both compounds had been synthesized by French chemists. Thank Thomas Bruton and William Murrell.

The first diuretics, to reduce edema (swelling) and lower blood pressure, were alkaloids derived from coffee and tea. These were not very effective, but better than leeches. Mercury compounds were pioneered by the Viennese physician Arthur Vogel in 1919. These worked, but were tough on the kidneys and liver. The first modern diuretics, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, were developed in the 1940s, with the American Karl Beyer playing a leading role.

The first anti-coagulants date from the ‘20s. A Johns Hopkins physiologist, William Howell, extracted a phospholipid from dog livers that he called heparin and that appeared to prevent blood clots. The first modern anti-coagulant, and still the most widely prescribed, was warfarin (Coumadin), developed as a rat-poison by Karl Link in Wisconsin in 1948. Its effectiveness, and lack of toxicity, was revealed when an army recruit took it in a suicide attempt.

Anti-arrhythmic drugs, to stabilize the heartbeat, were introduced in the opening decade of the 20th century. The first was derived from quinine. The big breakthrough occurred in 1962. Thank, once again, the Scotsman James Black, who synthesized propranolol in that year, the first beta-blocker. What they block are the receptors of epinephrine and norepinephrine. These two chemicals (catecholamines) increase the heart rate, blood pressure, and blood glucose levels, useful for many purposes, but not a good thing in patients with cardiac arrhythmia, irregular heartbeats. Beta-blockers are also prescribed to lower blood pressure.

ACE inhibitors lower the levels of an enzyme secreted by the kidneys and lungs that constricts blood vessels. The unpromising source for the first inhibitor was the venom of the Brazilian pit-viper. It was extracted, purified, and tested by three Squibb scientists in 1975, David Cushman, Miguel Ondetti, and Bernard Rubin. It’s still widely prescribed, though many other ACE inhibitors have since been designed. They are used for patients with congestive heart failure or who have had a heart attack, as well as those with hypertension.

Finally, mention must be made of the statins, which, though over-hyped and over-prescribed, lower serum cholesterol and reduce the risks of a second heart attack. A Japanese microbiologist, Akira Endo, derived, from a species of Penicillium, a substance that inhibited the synthesis of cholesterol, but it was too toxic to use on humans. In 1978, a team at Merck under Alfred Alberts had better luck with another fungus, and called the compound lovastatin. Statins work by inhibiting the activity of an enzyme called HMGR.

chuck said...

There is plenty more, INdustrial, space age etc etc inventions but you get the idea.

Shove the fuckin feathers up your ass.

Anonymous said...

Byron just got fucked in his twat... CHUCK WINS!!!!!!!!!
Byron ,stay away for ever you silly cunt.

Anonymous said...

Byrons response.... never needed any of that without whitemen.

WHITE MAN WINNAR said...

Chuck's right, WHITE PEOPLE RULE!

But I'll go one further. We beat the Injuns fair and square. They're a defeated people, a conquered race. So the white man takes what he wants!

If they'd been better armed, better organized, smarter, maybe they'd have won. But they lost. They're losers! Vanquished!

Same way we'll do in the negroes and hopefully put 'em in reservations...on the fucking Sun. But we won't be appropriating any of their garbage. No thanks.

Chuck is a shining beacon of whiteness whose genius and helorubium should be honored by all of us!!!

Anonymous said...

As always Chuck puts together very infomative posts with facts. To which he will get "you're a fuckhead dumbass Chuck" as a rebuttal. All while the poster making the rebuttal claims others are un-informed. Facts are stubborn things. Nice work Chuck!

Janky said...

All that Chuck has shown us is his debilitating racism which keeps him alone on a blog on a Saturday night. He is merely taking his racism and attempting to brand men with far more scientific knowledge with it. He is taking credit for their work when their achievement has nothing to do with him. It's projection and a poor attempt to try justify white supremacy by proxy. Lame, pathetic and not based in fact but the imagination of losers.

Anonymous said...

So you're saying it's PERFECT for this sh*the blog?!

Bwhahahhaahahhahahahhaa!

Anonymous said...

@8:06 Europe was in the dark ages before coming here.

Anonymous said...

CHUCK IS A GOD AMONG MEN, WORSHIP HIM, AND IS A PRIME EXAMPLE OF THE SUPERIORITY OF THE WHITE RACE, THE GREATEST, NICEST, SMARTEST AND BEST SMELLING RACE ON ANY PLANET IN ANY UNIVERSE, SEND HIM FLOWERS AND CANDY AND OFFER TO PUT HIS PENIS IN YOUR MOUTH

Anonymous said...

Raymond Damadian was a black guy.

Here's his bio.

But yeah, chuck, whatever, white power, blah blah blah.

Anonymous said...

Chuck is simply stating facts. Do you have any? Or just hatred?

Anonymous said...

Perfect!!!

Anonymous said...

I believe in curses. It’s the only explanation for a disability-faking, welfare cheat from the East Coast plaguing a Kansas City blog with comments wet with liberal tears. How else to explain Blie-Ron?

Anonymous said...

Janky, you’re analysis is full of crap. I’d try to explain it to you but you’re obviously thick as a plank and would not understand that Chuck’s factual statements are not racist. Your post was total nonsense.

Anonymous said...

If not for mascots American Indians would be nothing. They build nothing substantial ,invented next to nothing, wrote nothing and composed no music. Any interest in their culture should be embraced and celebrated least they be completely forgotten.

Anonymous said...

Jesus, you'd think Up-Chuck spent his life on a personal trail of tears due to lack of gratitude shown to white people. Times are sure hard on his native homeland territory.

Relax and take one of Whitey's invented sedatives (only because pharmaceuticals are probably something else Up-Chuck thinks Indians never developed on their own).

Hell, I'm surprised he's not asking for a skim from the reservation casinos running games appropriated from Up-Chuck's great great great ancestors. Or at least of his Asian mail order bride's heritage, which should also go to his house.

We get it, you think Whitey is superior, never did anything wrong, and Native Americans shouldn't complain.

Now will someone get him a old blanket as a peace offering.

Anonymous said...


Hey BYRON your ignorance just gets worse doesn't it? The Indians should be proud the they are respected enough to have a ball team named after them most Indians don't care one way or another.

BTW I don't appreciate racist Sharice Davids wanting to advertise that her heroes killed colonizers!

Good God give the Indians what they want and shut them up.

Anonymous said...

4:19 Probably thinks that if he was just out on the open plains in a Kevin Costner movie, he would pick up a hot redheaded chick and be "living large".

In reality, you would be sitting under a tree, picking fleas out of your fat wife's crotch and eating them for dinner.

Anonymous said...

Okay, I guess 11:16 wins. He called Chuck a racist.

Let's head on out, no one beat that for originality.

We can, take comfort in the fact that we don't have to actually meet her to know she is a fat, white, Obama voting, JoCo hog who hates her own kids, especially if they are white and even more if they are boys.

Every time you see some 400lb fat-ass in a motorized cart in the grocery store, buying products created by white people, remind her, that if she gets her way at the ballot box, in about 10 years, she is what is for dinner. Slowly roasted over a spit with an apple in her mouth, that is all she will be good for.

Anonymous said...

The best part, is where DACA kids are not responsible for the crimes of their parents, but white people, whose families never owned slaves are responsible for the sins of 19th century slave holders they never heard of.

Yeah Byron, America does hate white people.

chuck said...

The Chinese "Cornhole" virus will be here by April or May.

I wonder how many folks, who hate whitey, will line up for medicine created by white folks to save their lives?

Oh yeah..., all of them.

Anonymous said...

Imagine your cognitive abilities were very low (let's say you had an IQ of 85 or less). I would guess that your mathematical abilities would be limited to counting to ten, your vocabulary would be around 5,000 words (instead of the the 20,000-35,000 of a normal adult), logical thinking would be completely beyond you, and it would be difficult or impossible for you to master any but the simplest of skills--and even the mastery of simple skills would require much training and repetition, and constant and ongoing oversight.

What does such a person think of science, mathematics, music, literature, and art?

I would guess that, to such a person, such attainments are not only beyond their performance capabilities, but also well beyond their powers of perception. If you literally cannot reason, the claims and conclusions of reason will have no force for you, and you would be simply impervious to any kind of logical or mathematical progression of ideas. You would probably believe that anyone promoting such ideas was making it all up. Literature, whether purely pedestrian or literature-as-art, would have no meaning at all for you, and claims of its utility or beauty would seem to you to be falsehoods. In the visual arts and music, you would be incapable of discernment--either that or such performances would seem to you to require supernatural powers.

This stuff is beyond their cognitive powers to even perceive, let alone perform.

They are probably beyond the cognitive powers of a fair percentage of white people to perceive--and no one can do it without training. (If you've ever dabbled in the arts, you have probably learned that the eye has to be trained to really see color, and the ear has to be trained to hear tonalities.) This is one reason why culture must be diligently passed on to subsequent generations.

We have people denigrating Western Civilization for the simple reason that their ability to see it and understand it is roughly equal to that of your cat.

Anonymous said...

SO Chuck, who makes the Red man use some many drugs, drink to death and stab each other - afraid to work or obtain a basic education ? Me, um think'em, me um. Please write a response of well over ten million useless words to get attention. Most of my extended "skins " family are mere red niggas'. Acting exactly the same or worse. Ever see a 50 year old Squaw you would put the juice to ? Ha, if they live that long due to their own chosen demises. You do like squaws ? HOw many of these save the indian nation ever dated, been in the house of, lived around etc of one ? All a bunch of Warren Warrios with the same percentage of fake bloodline. IZ on the Rolls bitch.. Fuck the Chiefs or any cry baby that worries about their honoring people that most often have no honor or basic pride. A SPADE is A SPADE. Watch me go sign up for the benefits tomorrow, so I can get some pills and go to the casino and blow it all.

Anonymous said...

The U.S. will be majority minority by 2042, that's just 22 years from now according to the census bureau, already, the majority of those under 18 are minorities.

"No other country has experienced such rapid racial and ethnic change," said Mark Mather, a demographer with the Population Reference Bureau, a research organization in Washington. " https://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/14/world/americas/14iht-census.1.15284537.html

The destruction of western civilization is just getting started, as the demographics shift in the U.S. this destruction will accelerate.

All of the Dem candidates are pushing for reparations:

Reparations: $5.9 - $14 TRILLION
Slavery Reparations Could Cost up to $14 TRILLION, According to New Calculation
https://www.newsweek.com/slavery-reparations-could-cost-14-trillion-according-new-calculation-364141

So get ready and bow down before the gods of "social justice, diversity and inclusion" because if you don't the "elites" have a plan for you...

Anonymous said...

Byron has been knocked the fuck out.

Anonymous said...

american lady ho-s will take any culture and turn it into a slutty halloween costume, what other country does that?
What other country do the ladies wear yoga pants as pants when not exercising?

Anonymous said...

1:59, one example of something they composed is the ghost dance.
before that https://www.thedailybeast.com/how-an-iroquois-chief-helped-write-the-us-constitution

Tired of same shit said...

Fuck 'em. I don't give a shit. This isn't CA or NY. End of my concern.

Anonymous said...

An Iraqi chief? off with his head! Hahahahaha!

Anonymous said...

8:11 that's right! go suck on another corn dog and deep fried snickers bar.

Anonymous said...

Because no one in CA or NY ever eats those. Your logic soars beyond mortal understanding.

Anonymous said...

See, it's wonderful you do share something with california and NY dipshit.

Anonymous said...

"Cultural appropriation" is nonsense. Disparate groups have always adopted each other's good ideas and used it for their own benefit. If not for cultural appropriation, farming would still be limited to the Fertile Crescent, while horses would be tamed and ridden only in Central Asia. The best response to a numbskull accusing you of cultural appropriation is to tell the bozo to peddle his dumb ideas somewhere else, then ignore him.

Anonymous said...

^^^ +25,000,000

Anonymous said...

LOL 8:47 if you can call a white dude dressing up like a native american at a football game beneficial cultural appropriation.
It is not even cultural appropriation, it's white people being stoopid, again.

Anonymous said...

white people incorporating philosophies of the iroquois into the constitution is an example of beneficial cultural appropriation, but ya don't give them credit for that.

Anonymous said...

7:01

+1,000

You white boy haters be sure and so NO to those antibiotics when the pandemic hits.

Anonymous said...

there is a difference between cultural appropriation and incorporating/adopting aesthetic &/or symbolic appreciation, but still do not think a a ho in a slutty native american costume counts.

Anonymous said...

"Our results demonstrate the antimicrobial properties of R. and U. californica and illustrate their promising anti-MRSA potential. The findings reported herein give scientific credence to the traditional medicinal uses of these plants by the indigenous peoples of California and suggest that extracts of R. and U. californica merit further chemical study as natural antibiotics to identify the secondary metabolite(s) responsible for their antimicrobial activity, since such structures could serve as valuable therapeutic anti-MRSA leads."
MRSA Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium that causes infections in different parts of the body. It's tougher to treat than most strains of staphylococcus aureus -- or staph -- because it's resistant to some commonly used antibiotics.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4443625/
No research on indigenous medicinal plants for your antibiotic resistant diseases.

Anonymous said...

Weak

Anonymous said...

as if your argument that the invention of penicillin by a Scottish man justifies your insistence to wear a head dress at a football game is strong.

Ed Ziffel said...

Let's give credit where credit's due. The Indians where not devoid of wisdom. Many tribes had what they called the "once-a-month-lodge". When a squaw was on her period, that's where she lived until it was over. Much wisdom there.

Anonymous said...

maybe if you just admit that your sorry-not sorry that white people like to act a bunch of shameless idiots at sporting events and will continue to do so will resonate more.

Redding said...

All of these shitty comments and none of you realize that it's possible to love THE CHIEFS and respect Native Culture as well.

Grow up and expand your mind.

Anonymous said...

in all fairness i do not think that is possible 10:28. The name is the Chiefs and fans like to be kitschy with the name provided. Maybe if you change the name to the Kansas City leprechauns no one will be offended b/c the irish have different priorities.

Anonymous said...

KC Kestrels, KC Kerns, KC Merlins .....

Anonymous said...

There is only one good reason for a Caucasian guy to wear American Indian regalia at a Chiefs game: to piss off the snowflakes. And that's a very good reason indeed.

Anonymous said...

On the list of Whitey's contributions and accomplishments, Up-Chuck conveniently left off genocide of the indigenous.