Saturday, November 30, 2019

Making Kansas City Parks More Equitable



Thought this one was interesting if only because taxpayer subsidy, crime and culture war now dominate the discourse and cause us to forget about one of Kansas City's greatest resources. Read more . . .

Urban Land Institute to Advise Kansas City, Missouri on Creation of an Equitable Park System

Renowned Panel of Land Use, Planning Experts to Visit Area from December 1-6

A group of nationally renowned land use, urban planning and resilience experts representing the Urban Land Institute (ULI) will be making recommendations next week to Kansas City, Missouri, on the creation of an equitable park system. ULI is a global, multidisciplinary real estate organization whose work is driven by more than 45,000 members dedicated to responsible land use and building thriving, sustainable communities.

The Advisory Services panel is being conducted in conjunction with the 10-Minute Walk Campaign, a national movement striving to ensure that residents of urban neighborhoods throughout America have access to a high-quality park within a ten-minute walk from their homes. The 10-Minute Walk Campaign, which has been endorsed by over 230 mayors, involves a partnership between the Urban Land Institute, The Trust for Public Land, and the National Recreation and Park Association.

The ULI representatives, convened through ULI’s renowned Advisory Services Program, will be visiting the city from December 1-6. Sponsored by the Kansas City, Missouri, Parks and Recreation Association, the Advisory Services panelists will consider and provide strategic recommendations on:

- The primary factors Kansas City parks should consider when aligning use of park resources and missions;

- How the parks system should incorporate community input in the design of facilities and open spaces to mitigate inequity;

- How the system can balance newer growth areas of the city to the north with deferred maintenance of existing, older parks south of the river;

- How the parks system can maximize its existing resources and partnerships to meet the needs of the community; and

- The best strategy for developing resources necessary to fulfill the department’s mission.

The panel will be chaired by leading ULI member Carlton Brown, principal, Direct Invest, New York, New York. “The panel is excited to come to Kansas City and offer our assistance in making smart investments into public space.” said Brown. “We look forward to learning more about the parks system and outlining a plan to create more diverse and equitable areas across the city.”

In addition to interviewing stakeholders, the panel will tour the surrounding areas before developing recommendations that will be presented at the conclusion of the panel’s visit.

Now in its 72nd year, the ULI advisory services program assembles experts in the fields of real estate and land use planning to participate on panels worldwide, offering recommendations for complex planning and development projects, programs and policies. Panels have developed more than 700 studies for a broad range of land uses, ranging from waterfront properties to inner-city retail.

According to Thomas Eitler, senior vice president of ULI’s advisory services program, the strength of the program lies in ULI’s unique ability to draw on the substantial knowledge of its 46,000-plus members, including land developers, engineers, public officials, academics, lenders, architects, planners and urban designers. “The independent views of the panelists bring a fresh perspective to the land use challenge,” Eitler said. “The advisory services program is all about offering creative, innovative approaches to community building.”

Past sponsors of ULI advisory service panels include federal, state and local government agencies; regional councils of government; chambers of commerce; redevelopment authorities; private developers and property owners; community development corporations; lenders; historic preservation groups; non-profit community groups; environmental organizations and economic development agencies.
################

Developing . . .

18 comments:

Anonymous said...

Not very bright are we.

Anonymous said...

Once the hoodrats get MLK park cleaned up and beautified, including the Brush creek bath house, it will be the best in KCMO. MLK part will be a one spot gathering space for prayer vigils and balloon releases.

Anonymous said...

Ah how smart bring in New Yorkers to tell us how to create a nice town.


Brilliant isn't it?

Anonymous said...

Another "expert" slumming in flyover country bringing sophisticated ideas about diversity and equity.
From New York City, which currently has the highest rate of homelessness in its history.
What's in your wallet, KCMO taxpayers?
What could possibly go wrong?

Anonymous said...

You know, they all come to park in Kansas right? Perhaps KCMO taxpayers should chip in.

Anonymous said...

“The panel is excited to come to Kansas City and offer our assistance in making smart investments into public space.”


Oh boy here we go again

Anonymous said...


More parks would be nice but it's a bad idea until the crime is stopped and unfortunately criminals aren't punished enough and our city seems to think crime is fixed by talking and throwing pizza parties so........

Anonymous said...

Install 6 foot tall bulletproof metal panels in the urban youth parks and call them graffiti panels.

Land Use Idiots said...

We recommend many big box mixed used luxury apartments where under utilized park land is and more shake shacks, punch bowl socials, and destroying of unhealthy historic buildings and replace with glass box offices with green tinted glass on The Plaza.

Anonymous said...

How many billions will this cost us?

A park is a park, what more do you need other than picnic shelters, benches and places to bbq, Jesus Christ people this doesn’t require anything we don’t already know or have. The city is already selling off the parks like they give out tax breaks, Hell, we’ll be lucky if any of them are left in twenty years anyway.

Anonymous said...

Kansas City has a few fountains but few parks to mention. The parks to mention are primarily south of the river in the more affluent neighborhoods. Odd high percentage of undeveloped land. The parks to mention (and the parks not to mention) are not maintained. Ideally a municipality focuses on small neighborhood parks and larger community parks with recreation centers. Kansas City has a bunch of undeveloped land scalped by public works twice a year.

Anonymous said...

Before they say anything, make them explain what equity and inequity mean in the context of city parks. Then after you finish laughing, leave.

Anonymous said...

TOP PHOTO -- WELL-GROUNDED LESSON

When ex-girlfriend Denise sat down and slowly shed her sweater, I vowed to turn over a new leaf and make a good impression!!!

Anonymous said...

REAL TOP PHOTO
Parks are a great place to pick up trash!

Anonymous said...

Did you get the dig about parks North of the river vs. parks South of the river? You have to go pretty far north to find any land worth park status. There was supposed to be a Loose Park-style area near Staley neighborhoods. I think it was named after Anne Garney? So far, there is a small playground and a walking path. I'm guessing some developer has BIG PLANS for the area. Oh, and I forgot Penguin Park, also North of the river. It's packed every nice weekend. We've also got plenty of parkland that is unusable by the public. Example: Ball field (one diamond) at the intersection of Parvin and Prather. You wouldn't even know it was there unless you walked over to the edge of the road and looked DOWN about 50 feet. Ball field has no access and no parking, but it still "counts" as a park for the North.

Anonymous said...

"The Advisory Services panel is being conducted in conjunction with the 10-Minute Walk Campaign, a national movement striving to ensure that residents of urban neighborhoods throughout America have access to a high-quality park within a ten-minute walk from their homes."
New York sure does not meet this criteria so until this group cleans up their own backyard they need to stay out of KCMO.

Anonymous said...

GENUINE TOP PHOTO

The Grimm Truth is that Little Red Riding Hood enjoyed being eaten by the Wolf!

Anonymous said...

another real estate scam.