Tuesday, July 30, 2019

JoCo Box Store Crisis Coming Soon

Insight on a property tax threat that's hitting the suburbs during the decline of retail. Read more:

Johnson County Leaders Fear A 'Tsunami' Of Revenue Loss If Big Box Stores Win Tax Appeals

While residents are in an uproar this summer over residential property assessments in Jackson County, Missouri, an equally important battle is underway in Johnson County, Kansas, where big box stores are successfully challenging major increases in their commercial property values. The trend could significantly reduce future tax dollars for Johnson County schools, libraries and cities.

12 comments:

Bob said...

Of course the politicos want to paint the most dire picture. The fact is that if they adjust their budgets and cut back on building palaces for every county department and taxing jurisdiction things will be fine. Let Public works drive the same pick up trucks another year or two, things will be fine. Stop building big stone markers for every county building opting for a metal sign on a wooden pole, save millions of dollars. Will they do things like that? Hell no! They will reduce services and cut library hours and raise water and sewer rates. They will stop filling potholes until the general public becomes so frustrated that they will again and again raise taxes. These county managers don't see that the same process of determining value of a residential property and a commercial property should be equitable. The amount of business (dollars) a building generates is not part of the value of the building and land. They already get sales taxes so in essence they double dip on commercial. Any commissioner that votes to raise mill levies I will actively campaign against.

Anonymous said...

I read the whole article and the previous comment and my question is this, How do they value an empty building on a specific piece of property? Why should it matter what business moves into the building for the value? It sounds to me like the Johnson County Commission INTENTIONALLY jacked up the commercial big box stores valuations. Now caught in their improper dealings they threaten to put the burden on the tax paying residential public. Now is the time for them to prepare to cut the mill levies on those structures and cut spending on projects and budgets. You Ed Eilert and the OPKS city manager have been caught red handed and you should be ashamed.

Anonymous said...

Many of the stores and restaurants will be closing anyway once Sprint leaves.

Anonymous said...

Cut spending on idiotic glamour crap projects and stop giving away 25 year tax exemptions to developers and big corporations.

Problem solved.

Thank you

Anonymous said...

The problem is assessing fair market value to a vacant or soon to be vacant building. Mostly the building is worth zero since there will be significant cost to tear it down. The land only has value after the tear down. If someone does find a use for the building it either requires a huge remodel or its used for a thrift store neither of which makes the building of much value.

Anonymous said...

How about making those hundreds of churches pay taxes?

Anonymous said...

For example, say my house is vacant, the county still charges me the same taxes empty or not, why would big box stores be any different? Just asking.

Anonymous said...

^^Winner Winner Chicken Dinner

Anonymous said...

No problem, just increase the tax levy rate on residential properties to make up the shortfall.

Anonymous said...

Shhh, thats a secret.

Anonymous said...

an operating store requires more municipal services than an empty one. just ask the legislature to change the law and nullify the court decisions

Anonymous said...

3:24 If your house is vacant you can sell it provided it is in good shape. A vacant big box store cannot be sold for anywhere near its original cost even if it is in perfect shape.