Saturday, January 05, 2019

Kansas Quickly Becoming Desert

According to the world's most accurate encyclopedia The Ogallala Aquifer is a shallow water table aquifer surrounded by sand, silt, clay, and gravel located beneath the Great Plains in the United States.

And here's how farmer mismanagement and politics are destroying it . . .

Kansas farmers are running out of water | New Food Economy

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Irresponsible farming has depleted beyond our lifetime. Its former glacier water mostly, or was. Many farmers wanted to switch to hemp farming years ago. Uses less water, but as usual backwards KS state politicians freaked out about the idea. So did the state law enforcement associations. They said it would send the wrong message about marijuana.

Anonymous said...

^^^ Stoner for Hemp

Anonymous said...

send water from eastern Kansas west through pipelines

Anonymous said...

One giant problem is it snows so much less than it used to. The aquifer got recharged by melting snow from the Rockies. And yes, hemp should have been passed decades ago. You morons that think marijuana and hemp are the same thing ate clueless. You could smoke a rail car full of hemp and not get a buzz.

Anonymous said...

The article's author, Corie Brown, began with an informative piece concerning the long-term impacts upon the Ogallala Aquifer.

She then quickly transitioned into a political screed against Conservatives, and in particular Kansas resident Charles Koch. Ms. Brown would seemingly like to deny Mr. Koch his 1st Amendment rights and forcibly shutdown think-tanks that don't agree with her political ideology.

Let the Left embrace this special Snowflake, watch her melt, and recede into the Kansas soil. Then she might actually make a small contribution to Kansas' groundwater supply.

Anonymous said...

For many years, smart advocates have argued farmers should "dry farm". Yield per acre is less, but better than what will be possible after the impending exhaustion of the aquifer. Wells have had to be dug deeper year after year.
Unfortunately, many farmers bought expensive acreage requiring heavy debt repayment requiring high yield irrigated crops to pay off.

Water may well become the next scarce resource for all of us.