Thursday, August 31, 2017

Kansas City Vietnam Homecoming



Stellar clip that's #TBT appropriate . . . Check this story or a Vietnam Vet talking about his tour and return trip to the States and Kansas City.

Description . . .

"Dr. James Willbanks served in Vietnam in the early 1970s as an Army Advisor, and now teaches history at the Army Command and General Staff College in Leavenworth, Kansas. Willbanks shares what it’s like to teach a war he experienced first hand and his role in Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s epic documentary "The Vietnam War."

"LZs or Landing Zones were used extensively in the Vietnam War to move forces in and out of combat zones. The "LZ Kansas City" series tells the stories of local veterans who “landed” back here after the war, as well as our region’s contributions and reactions."

Take a look:



You decide . . .

8 Comments:

chuck said...

Thanks Dr. James Wilbanks, for your service.

Anonymous said...

I'm thankful I wasn't born in the era where I could've been drafted to go to that God awful war. The politicians war to make money for the war machines.

The 60's were a turbulent times in this country. Prominent people getting assassinated and all, crazy.

Anonymous said...

At least Dr. Wilbanks is a "Vietnam Veteran" who actually served in Vietnam. This town is full of "Vietnam Veterans" who spent two years sorting socks in a Quartermaster Corps Warehouse at Fort Riley, KS; or doing something at some Air Force base in Missouri or Naval station on one of the Coasts.

It's ironic that Vietnam Combat Veterans seem to be the most modest about their service, the least outspoken about "Patriotism" and not at all worried about the concept of "Stolen Valor". Perhaps that's because they have actually put their lives at risk in the service of their Country, they have lost friends to violence, and are aware of the reality and gravity of what they have accomplished and less concerned with recognition by others, they know their own value, and they have their own pride. They are the quiet ones, and they don't really need your thanks for their service.

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS - BRING THEM HOME!



Anonymous said...

Ladies and gentlemen...Lee Greenwood!!! "And I'm proud to be an American where at least I know I'm free......

Anonymous said...

10:05, The vast majority of Greatest Generation WW2 service members, and most of those on duty for the Korean War (not "conflict", nor "police action") were true patriots (men AND women) who answered the call to help deter despots and communists. Plenty of military personnel having VietNam War era experience did the same, and like the ones before them, deserve gratitude. I have family, friends, and former coworkers (as a contract USMC & USAF employee alongside uniformed military) who said through the years they appreciate being acknowledged for their service.

ALL jobs (MOS/DOS/covert) globally--stateside--and classified, are extremely valuable to readiness and missions. As for socks, decent socks (and much else) are often requested by the recently deployed. Sending useful and novelty items to our current troops is one smallway I've thanked them and try to honor their sacrifices. Home repairs and other volunteer acts are done for vets, as the multiple generations of vets in my family have gladly done.

Byron Funkhouser said...

I want to take this opportunity to thank Chuck for his service.

I think he is mentally ill, but he came to be mentally ill because of his service during Viet Nam.

Though I am a veteran, I would not presume to argue that my service was equal to his.

He saw the worst of war, while I joined the day that Nixon resigned.

Anonymous said...

Liar^^^^^^^^

Anonymous said...

How long do you think it will take to bring back the draft? The War Machine in Washington is ramping up military action all around the globe. Eventually, they will run out of willing volunteers and start calling for fresh meat. Anybody out there have a teenage boy or girl who will turn 18 soon? Expect them to called up to serve in the various conflicts. Say goodbye now.