Monday, January 21, 2013

Missouri/Kansas Defy President Obama

Flyover States hate Executive Orders: Legislators in Missouri, Kansas and elsewhere look to nullify federal laws

12 Comments:

Hamilton said...

There is no where in the Constitution that allows states to nullify federal law. These are sham efforts and should be reported as such.

Hamilton said...

There is no where in the Constitution that allows states to nullify federal law. These are sham efforts and should be reported as such.

Anonymous said...

Reported?

lol

Mommy! Billy touched my sandwich and made a funny face at me again!!!

Anonymous said...

Hamilton is a douche.

Second Amendment Preservation Act said...

Nullification is a concept of constitutional law recognizing the right of each state to nullify, or invalidate, any federal measure that exceeds the few and defined powers allowed the federal government as enumerated in the Constitution.

Nullification exists as a right of the states because the sovereign states formed the union, and as creators of the compact, they hold ultimate authority as to the limits of the power of the central government to enact laws that are applicable to the states and the citizens thereof.

As President Obama and the United Nations accelerate their plan to disarm Americans, the need for nullification is urgent, and liberty-minded citizens are encouraged to see state legislators boldly asserting their right to restrain the federal government through application of that very powerful and very constitutional principle.

It is important to remember, finally, that any act of the federal government exceeding the limited powers granted it by the Constitution is not a law at all. Witness the words of Alexander Hamilton in The Federalist, No. 33:

If a number of political societies enter into a larger political society, the laws which the latter may enact, pursuant to the powers intrusted [sic] to it by its constitution, must necessarily be supreme over those societies and the individuals of whom they are composed.... But it will not follow from this doctrine that acts of the larger society which are not pursuant to its constitutional powers, but which are invasions of the residuary authorities of the smaller societies, will become the supreme law of the land. These will be merely acts of usurpation, and will deserve to be treated as such. [Emphasis in original.]

Anonymous said...

1/21/13, 9:37 AM

It is that kind of convoluted and fucked up thinking that led to the Civil War, and your side lost.

(You lost in the Supreme Court even before that.)

Anonymous said...

The states have no power to rule on the constitutionality of federal laws. Try again, crack pot.

Anonymous said...

Nothing is funnier (unintentionall) than right wing old white men with high school educations regurgitating internet constitutional law "interpretations" from the lunatic fringe blogosphere.

Go buy another AR to "defend your home", Bubba...just don't drive on a taxpayer funded road on you way to Walmart/Cabelas/Bass Pro, or us the taxpayer funded USPS to ship your ammo.

Little dick mothefuckers.

Too busy said...

From a practical perspective, if the local law enforcement agencies (Police, Sheriff's, State troopers) don't enforce the disputed laws, who will? The real cops are too busy trying to keep up with enforcement of legitimate laws. They should just let the federal law enforcement personnel deal with the questionable new federal laws.

Anonymous said...

but, to our lefty friends out there, if cities like San Fran decide to ignore federal immigration laws, by creating sanctuary cities, it's acceptable. I'm just keeping up to date on my hypocrisy/bullshit card.

Reality said...

The courts have found that under Article III of the Constitution, the final power to declare federal laws unconstitutional has been delegated to the federal courts and that the states therefore do not have the power to nullify federal law.

Anonymous said...

See
Ableman v. Booth, 62 U.S. 506 (1859)

Cooper v. Aaron, 358 U.S. 1 (1958)

Sorry but neither opinion is generally available in crayon.