Sunday, April 09, 2017

Brainstorm Or Sacrilege??? Kansas City Faith Writer 'Radically Rethinks' Catholic Priesthood

In his latest piece for The National Catholic Reporter, Bill Tammeus proves he doesn't really understand much about Catholics or one of their least troubling concerns . . .

Money line:

"I don't know where a thorough look at the issue of ordination will take the church. What I do know is that ordination can and does sometimes turn into clericalism, in which pastors, priests, imams and rabbis acquire almost unquestioned authority. That's not good for anyone, including the clergy."

Read more:

It may be time to radically rethink ordination

A movement called NEXT Church, made up of leaders from congregations in the Presbyterian Church (USA), the denomination that includes my church, recently provided a venue for me to say something that even surprised me a little.

13 Comments:

Anonymous said...

We knew a guy who came here to be a street preacher for IHOP. Though he proclaimed to be some deep intellectual, he just ranted on and on like aDavid Koresh story. After 20 or 30 minutes of this guy lecturing about what he read the night before you would try to get a word in edgewise even though you had no idea what the hell he was talking about. Then the guy would forcefully yell, "you're oppressing me!" I'm like WTF dude, I don't buy taco's for the people I oppress". The friendship ended when he defended a guy who was molesting students off campus at KU by saying, "you all are no better than the Nazi's!" We were like, Ok dude, fuck you, no more free taco's for you!"

Anonymous said...

That Catholic thing about worshipping idols is kinda freaky too, come to mention it.

Anonymous said...

A presbyterian with minimal if any theological training, opining about a church in which he does not belong, about an ordination he does not understand, in a publication that has repeatedly been censured and asked to stop using the name Catholic because most of the drivel it publishes is anything but.

I wonder what he thinks about the streetcar.

Anonymous said...

When churches radically rethink those offering plates lets talk.

Anonymous said...

It won't be a problem in 20 years. There will be nobody in the catholic priesthood except some fucking misfit weirdos that everyone avoids like they are on the Sex Offenders Registry.
You know....sort of like now.

Anonymous said...

^ then we'll just have the Imans at the local Mosque to lead their followers in "Man Love Thursday", beat up some women, and throw some gays off tall buildings.

Anonymous said...

Lead us to your infidels. We love America.

Anonymous said...

a little learning is a dangerous thing.

JimBrasco said...

Have to agree that Bill is out of his depth here, what he doesn't know about the Catholic Church is way to obvious. This is a classic example of religious ignorance. If it was against almost any other group, he would be seen as a bigot.

Anonymous said...

the dangerous thing is that he presumes to advise on matters about which he knows so little.

he does them same thing on political issues where he claims religious insight while revealing little economics or policy base knowledge.

Anonymous said...

Nevermind wagons, this piece circles the drain for me, because Bill, failed to say it. "It" is the inevitability for women and couples, as Catholic pastors. There are already lay ministers, deacons, novitiates, and other congregant servants filling roles in many Catholic parishes alongside priests. Women and couples should be installed as Catholic pastors, but still get the required, full seminary instructions for degrees. Yes, there's apparently a shortage of celibacy-vowed MEN. Open up to others, like, yesterday. C'mon, it's waaaay past time!

Anonymous said...

You wonder what his ex wife thinks about him

Galen said...

As an ordained Presbyterian minister (sometimes called 'Teaching Elder' other times 'Minister of Word and Sacrament') Bill is approaching the issue of ordination from a Presbyterian/Reformed Protestant perspective. He clearly identifies that in his remarks. He was invited by a Roman Catholic publication to share his comments about ordination. Yes, what he talks about is NOT the Roman Catholic understanding of ordination. What he does talk about does provide a different viewpoint of some of the issues that a conversation about ordination might want to address. It is also an invitation for all fellowships and communions to consider in their rules and doctrines about the role of ordination and leadership.